1. Education
Richard Nordquist

Subordination With Adverb Clauses: Practice in Building, Combining, and Revising Sentences (Part Three)

By January 28, 2013

Follow me on:

Welcome to part three of our series on sentence combining. (If you missed parts one and two, see Language Legos and Coordination.) The focus this month is on combining sentences with adverb clauses (also known as adverbial clauses).

As usual, the "sample answers" at the end are just that--examples of satisfactory combinations and revisions. You, of course, can do better.

  1. Turning a Compound Sentence Into a Complex Sentence
    The following compound sentence is made up of two main clauses joined by and:
    The national speed limit was reduced to 55 miles per hour, and road accidents decreased sharply.
    Emphasize the relationship between the two clauses by (1) eliminating and, and (2) turning the first main clause into an adverb clause beginning with When.

  2. Combining With Subordinating Conjunctions
    Combine these two sentences by turning the second sentence into an adverb clause beginning with an appropriate subordinating conjunction of time:
    In a Junction City diner, a sunburned farmer comforts his squirming son.
    His wife sips coffee and recalls the high school prom.

  3. Combining With Other Subordinating Conjunctions
    Combine these two sentences by turning the first sentence into an adverb clause beginning with an appropriate subordinating conjunction of concession and comparison:
    Teachers who contend wth blank or hostile minds deserve our sympathy.
    Those who teach without sensitivity and imagination deserve our criticism.

  4. Rearranging Adverb Clauses
    Shift the adverb clause to the beginning of the sentence, and make the pronoun it the subject of the main clause.
    The forest supports incessant warfare, most of which is hidden and silent, although the forest looks peaceful.

  5. Reducing Adverb Clauses
    Make this sentence more concise by dropping the subject and verb from the adverb clause.
    While he was on maneuvers in South Carolina, Billy Pilgrim played hymns he knew from childhood.

Sample Answers:

  1. When the national speed limit was reduced to 55 miles per hour, road accidents decreased sharply.

  2. "In a Junction City diner, a sunburned farmer comforts his squirming son while his wife sips coffee and recalls the high school prom."
    (Richard Rhodes, The Inland Ground. 1970)

  3. Although teachers who contend with blank or hostile minds deserve our sympathy, those who teach without sensitivity and imagination deserve our criticism.

  4. Although the forest looks peaceful, it supports incessant warfare, most of which is hidden and silent.

  5. While on maneuvers in South Carolina, Billy Pilgrim played hymns he knew from childhood.
    (Kurt Vonnegut, Slaughterhouse-Five, 1969)

Stop back on February 25 for additional practice in building, combining, and revising sentences. Or if you can't wait, try your hand at the exercises below.

Additional Practice in Building, Arranging, and Combining Sentences With Adverb Clauses:

Comments

No comments yet. Leave a Comment

Leave a Comment


Line and paragraph breaks are automatic. Some HTML allowed: <a href="" title="">, <b>, <i>, <strike>

©2014 About.com. All rights reserved.