1. Education
Richard Nordquist

100 Words and Phrases That Ticked You Off in 2012

By December 12, 2012

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Humorist James Thurber claimed to be an authority on four subjects: "bloodhounds, holy matrimony, monsters, and modern English misusage."

Unlike the usually docile dogs in his famous cartoons, Thurber was quick to snap at meddling copy editors. "I rarely use the ugly word grew," he told one poor fellow at The New York Times Book Review, "and I have changed it back to was. This is not only good English, it is the way I write, and this is my piece."

Or, as he once advised another editor, "A word to the wise is not sufficient if it doesn't make sense."

On occasion Thurber's semantic gripes reflected deeper cultural concerns:

I loathe the expression "What makes him tick." It is the American mind, looking for simple and singular solution, that uses the foolish expression. A person not only ticks, he also chimes and strikes the hour, falls and breaks and has to be put together again, and sometimes stops like an electric clock in a thunderstorm.*
So with Thurber's remarks in mind, tell us what common expressions tick you off. Below are 100 verbal pet peeves submitted by readers over the past 12 months. To contribute an annoying expression to our next list, go to 100 Words and Phrases That Ticked You Off in 2013 and click on "comments" at the end of the post.

  1. across the world (instead of "around the world")
  2. amazing
  3. A.M. in the morning
  4. anyways
  5. artisanal
  6. at the end of the day
  7. at my earliest convenience
  8. awesome
  9. baby daddy and baby mama
  10. back in the day

  11. based off
  12. beast (as slang for "very good")
  13. best in (its) class (as used by advertisers)
  14. between you and I
  15. biatch
  16. boiler plate
  17. boobies
  18. called out
  19. center (as in "learning center," "worship center," and "wellness center")
  20. change up

  21. charming (as used by real estate agents)
  22. claims (instead of "says")
  23. conversate (instead of "converse")
  24. Copy me on the email.
  25. disinterested (instead of "uninterested")
  26. disrespected (as in "He disrespected me")
  27. Do the math.
  28. Do you know what I mean?
  29. dude
  30. enhanced

  31. enough said
  32. epic (in reference to anything except an actual epic)
  33. exactly (overused as an interjection)
  34. exspecially (instead of "especially")
  35. fail (as in, "That was such an epic fail")
  36. fair share (as in "Everyone must give their fair share")
  37. focus like a laser beam
  38. for free
  39. formally (instead of "formerly")
  40. game changer

  41. give back (as in "It's time to give back to our community")
  42. going forward
  43. gone missing and went missing
  44. gone viral
  45. heads-up (as in "Give me a heads-up")
  46. heighth (instead of "height")
  47. Hello! (as an expression of annoyance)
  48. He reports into him (instead of "He reports to him")
  49. home invasion (instead of "break-in")
  50. hone in (instead of "home in")

  51. i.e. (instead of "e.g.")
  52. It is what it is.
  53. It's so fun.
  54. just as an FYI
  55. kick the can down the road
  56. legit
  57. Let me be clear.
  58. Let me be honest with you.
  59. Let's agree to disagree.
  60. leverage (corporate-speak)

  61. Listen up, people.
  62. looks to be (as in "Wow, that looks to be a real bad accident")
  63. love me some
  64. magic and miracle (as used by advertisers)
  65. mute (instead of "moot")
  66. my bad
  67. myself (instead of "me")
  68. never did nothing
  69. no brainer
  70. not a problem

  71. no worries
  72. OMG
  73. on accident (instead of "by accident")
  74. organic
  75. personally (when used to preface a remark)
  76. please excuse (when used without an object)
  77. pre-owned
  78. prolly (instead of "probably")
  79. revert back
  80. revitalization (in reference to a business that's laying off workers)

  81. riffed (short for "reduction in force"--i.e., laid off)
  82. rock (used as a verb, as in "Jennifer Lopez rocks another bodysuit")
  83. Shoot me now!
  84. sick (as in "Dude, that's sick")
  85. skill set
  86. stakeholders (when referring to faculty and staff at a university)
  87. sucks (as in "That sucks")
  88. supposably (for "supposedly")
  89. sustainable
  90. swag (instead of "gift")

  91. take a listen (popular with TV news anchors)
  92. that being said
  93. That's just wrong.
  94. touch base (unless you're actually playing baseball)
  95. trending
  96. True that.
  97. twenty-four-seven (or "24/7")
  98. utilize (instead of "use")
  99. versing (instead of "versus")
  100. you guys (especially when referring to a group of women)

* Letter to Frances Glennon, June 24, 1959, in Selected Letters of James Thurber, edited by Helen Thurber and Edward Weeks (Little, Brown and Company, 1980).

More Annoying Words and Phrases:

Image: James Thurber (1894-1961)


Comments

December 12, 2012 at 1:57 am
(1) Rahul Deodhar says:

Love it! Quite a few are mistakes rather than irritating usage of words.

1) Good to know that I am not the only one who is offended at being called a dude.

2) “you guys” for a girl or mixed group never fails to annoy me.

3) “my bad” is also my peeves.

4) “FYI” and “copy me on email” are frustrating.

5) so is “sucks” but I can live with it.

December 13, 2012 at 2:37 pm
(2) AP Language Class says:

Sorry, not sorry.
Fire
Hashtag
Sucks to suck
totes
BeeTee dubs (Sorry Marcusky)
Swerve
Awk
Twerking
Issues
ratchet
crusty

December 17, 2012 at 11:45 am
(3) David Hogberg says:

The use of “hone in” when “home in” is correct.

(I ask if the writer has ever heard of a honing pigeon.)

December 17, 2012 at 11:46 am
(4) Chris Conley says:

That really “resonates” with me or any variation of resonate.

December 17, 2012 at 11:47 am
(5) Dr. Sandra POund says:

Makes you want to slap your mama.

December 17, 2012 at 11:50 am
(6) Michael says:

Some of my peeves are .. ” I seen him” … “I borrowed her the money”
“Prolly” (probably} .. “nom’ sayin” ( know what I’m saying)… “Sup”
( What’s up}
..

December 17, 2012 at 11:55 am
(7) Michael Quinn says:

“I seen him” “I borrowed him the money” “Sup” (what’s up) “prolly” (probably) “nom’ sayin” (know what I’m saying)

December 17, 2012 at 11:59 am
(8) George DelMonte says:

You may add, LOL, LMAO, “baby bump,” “horrific” “ride” (as in winning the championship was a great ride) and “ta tas” (as in save the ta tas),

December 17, 2012 at 12:05 pm
(9) Alyssa says:

I hate YOLO, as if that is a good excuse to do something stupid.

December 17, 2012 at 12:09 pm
(10) Beverly Herndon says:

“Not a problem” instead of “you’re welcome”.

“Man” as in “hey, man” .

“Put on your big boy pants”.

“Left” instead of “let” as in “His company left him go.”

December 17, 2012 at 1:11 pm
(11) Jane Harland says:

“crunching numbers”. As in “first we’ll have to crunch the numbers on that.”
Not only does the expression demonstrate illiteracy; it also demonstrates innumeracy.

December 17, 2012 at 1:13 pm
(12) solo says:

I despise hearing people say, “Ya know what I mean,” or “Ya know what I”m saying.” Also, I”m sick of “pop,” as in this color will make the room pop.

December 17, 2012 at 1:15 pm
(13) Ellen says:

My biggest pet peeve phrase of all time: “Up for grabs”.

December 17, 2012 at 1:22 pm
(14) jerr says:

“Gun violence” instead of gun abuse. Is the technology at fault?

December 17, 2012 at 2:25 pm
(15) QOFE817 says:

Cra-cra (instead of crazy)
Re-re (as in retarded)

December 17, 2012 at 2:37 pm
(16) Fran Bryant says:

Thank You Very Much! What to say when you mean VERY MUCH?

December 17, 2012 at 2:38 pm
(17) MTnman says:

Politicians use of: “Infrastructure,” “bottom line,” “the fact of the matter is …,” “the American people say …,” and “at the end of the day …,” “I’m excited for/about …” are vacuous terms used to bamboozle and deflect but are implemented as indicating something of substance.

There should be a booklet of favorite rhetorical terms used by feckless bureaucrats.

December 17, 2012 at 3:27 pm
(18) Aunt Shecky says:

“Going forward” instead of “in the future” or from “now on.”

Instead of “before,” saying “ahead of,” as in “Residents of the East Coast are making emergency plans ahead of Hurricane Sandy.”

“So” as an intensifier, oddly placed in front of a verb, as this one by SC Governor Haley: “I SO want to have voter I.D.”

Worse of all is the misuse of first-person pronouns– the reluctance to say “me,” as in: “Everyone contributed to the clean-up, including my parents, my wife, and myself.” For some reasons sportscasters are fond of using “I” as if it were in the objective case: “The newly-signed pitcher gave interviews to reporters from ESPN and I the other day.”

December 17, 2012 at 4:09 pm
(19) Bonnie says:

incentivize

December 17, 2012 at 4:17 pm
(20) Rae says:

What about the phrase “These ones.” Example, “These ones are more expensive.” I hear this all the time and it is horrible!

December 17, 2012 at 4:43 pm
(21) 4sunshine says:

I hate hearing how people are “waiting on each other” when they are really waiting FOR each other.

December 17, 2012 at 4:48 pm
(22) Hilary says:

I was thinking about an obituary list–words that died during 2012.

Some of these belong among the words whose meanings are gone, gone, gone, and others are just annoying:

Closed captioning writes “What you got?” for “What have you got?”
“Actually” and “also” are almost never necessary..
“Literally” The images that rise up in the imagination when this word is used!
“Iconic”
“More unique” and “most unique”
“Price point” for “price”

December 17, 2012 at 7:00 pm
(23) David Rynerson says:

It’s kind of cute when my elementary school soccer players use “vs.” as a verb: “Who are we versing next, coach?”

December 17, 2012 at 7:04 pm
(24) David Rynerson says:

“…iteration” of “21st Century” “Design Thinking…”

December 17, 2012 at 7:25 pm
(25) Jerru OConnell says:

If I hear someone say “thrown under the bus” once more, I’m stuffin’ them in the wood chipper.

December 17, 2012 at 8:22 pm
(26) Susan Saltzman says:

Have any of you “thrown someone under a bus?”

December 17, 2012 at 8:32 pm
(27) Jacey Sohn says:

Ooops, I titled my corporate blog as’xxx Communication center’ already.

December 17, 2012 at 8:45 pm
(28) liz k says:

The (market, temperature, number or amount of anything) ‘ticked’ up (or down) instead of increased or decreased etc.

Answering a question starting with ‘so’ as in ‘How does this happen?’;
Answer ‘So’, the way this happens…” ‘What were you doing?’; ‘So’, we were digging…’ ‘What is its name?’; ‘So’, its name is…’ ‘How are you?’
‘So’, I’m just fine …’
This is especially prevalent in interviews on the radio. Maybe I don’t watch enough TV.

December 17, 2012 at 8:48 pm
(29) liz k says:

The (market, temperature, number or amount of anything) ‘ticked’ up (or down) instead of increased or decreased etc.

Answering a question starting with ‘so’ as in ‘How does this happen?’;
Answer ‘So’, the way this happens…” ‘What were you doing?’; ‘So’, we were digging…’ ‘What is its name?’; ‘So’, its name is…’ ‘How are you?’
‘So’, I’m just fine …’
This is especially prevalent in interviews on the radio. Maybe I don’t watch enough TV.

Also, ‘flush out’ an idea instead of ‘flesh out’.

December 18, 2012 at 12:07 am
(30) Frank H. says:

I grow weary of two words that try to say everything, but really say
nothing at all. to wit:

professional (as in ” That’s not very professional of you.”)
and:
values (as in ” the values of the organization require study.”)
A thesaurus must contain many ways to redefine these ho-hums.

December 18, 2012 at 2:05 am
(31) David Rynerson says:

These adjectives are loaded and subjective: “appropriate” and “inappropriate.”

December 18, 2012 at 2:18 am
(32) Deb says:

My current pet peeves:
had went (makes my teeth grind)
try and (instead of try to)
think on (instead of think about)
wait on (instead of wait for)

December 18, 2012 at 2:58 am
(33) Marc says:

- “at about 7:00″ – It’s either at 7:00 or about 7:00
- a perennial winner: very unique, quite unique, somewhat unique
- and, “and etc.”

December 18, 2012 at 8:45 am
(34) Guy says:

Some years ago, my alma mater re-christened (oops, is “christening” allowed these days??) the main University library the “XXXX Library Center.” I wrote them a letter asking what a “library center” offered that the perfectly good word “library” did not. Never got an answer.

December 18, 2012 at 11:26 am
(35) David Winter says:

I’m exhausted by the number of “heroes” we have around us. How could we have so many heroes? The word is being diluted by overuse. A hero was always someone very special that stood out from the crowd. Now it seems we have crowds of heroes. It is truly losing its meaning.

December 18, 2012 at 11:32 am
(36) Rose921K says:

How cool is that?

December 18, 2012 at 11:42 am
(37) Shawna says:

My biggest peve….. WHATEVER……

December 18, 2012 at 11:58 am
(38) Bobby Davis says:

“Get your ________ on.” As in, “Get your freak on,” get your drink on, get your dazzle on, whatever. Overused and annoying.

I have also seen on television quite a bit the misuse of “hanged”: police find a person who has been hanged, and they say “hung,” which is used for clothes and other inanimate objects but not persons. It happens too often not to be a trend. “He must have hung himself.”

December 18, 2012 at 12:02 pm
(39) Carol says:

“One off” to describe any demo or class that happens just one time and “Cohort” to describe any group of people in a class or workshop has begun to drive me nuts at work.

December 18, 2012 at 12:12 pm
(40) Mary says:

Reach out to as in I’ll reach out to him.

I hate it espeically in business!

December 18, 2012 at 12:37 pm
(41) mARY says:

especially

I really do know how to spell, so blame the keyboard!

December 18, 2012 at 1:34 pm
(42) Melanie says:

My pet peeve for 2012 is “know what I’m sayin?” I hear it so often from a coworker that at times I respond… “No! I don’t.”

I still have issues with using “est” as a descriptor rather than “more” or “most”. Would the song be “the wonderfulest time of the year” rather than “the most wonderful time of the year”?

December 18, 2012 at 2:08 pm
(43) Joan says:

I’ve go two that annoy me. 1) Gone missing ( I don’t know if this correct or not, but it always sounds wring to me.) 2). ending a sentence with “and that type of thing”.

December 18, 2012 at 3:11 pm
(44) nancy says:

I can’t stand the misuse of irregardless instead of regardless.

December 18, 2012 at 3:50 pm
(45) Aurora says:

Calling Robert Pattinson R-Patz really ticks me off. I mean he has a name. If I were him, I would be offended by this ugly concoction.

December 18, 2012 at 5:31 pm
(46) chp says:

begs the question (for raises the question)

December 18, 2012 at 5:32 pm
(47) chp says:

begs the question (for: raises the question)

the proof is in the pudding (for: the proof of the pudding is in the eating)

December 18, 2012 at 6:33 pm
(48) Booje says:

“just sayin” is another phrase that is not high on my list.

#96 is as well.

December 18, 2012 at 8:45 pm
(49) Eric says:

100 words and none of them are “YOLO”? This whole list is epic fail.

December 18, 2012 at 9:27 pm
(50) Deborah says:

I agree with so many on the list – but ‘baby bump’ drives me nuts.

December 18, 2012 at 10:31 pm
(51) Lonnie says:

Just saying.

December 18, 2012 at 10:41 pm
(52) kaleitha says:

2012?!? Some of these words should have disappeared a decade ago. I absolutely HATE baby mama and baby daddy.

December 19, 2012 at 12:45 am
(53) Elizabeth Weitz says:

He was laying there (on the ground, eg.)

December 19, 2012 at 1:59 am
(54) Vicki says:

Lots of good ones on the list, but I wish “bling” would go away.

December 19, 2012 at 2:07 am
(55) Sally says:

“Come with.”

Not “come with me” … just “come with.”

Is this a loan-translation, or is it supposed to be childlike and ‘cute’?

December 19, 2012 at 2:45 pm
(56) Louisa Braley says:

You forgot “I’m just sayin’.” (I’m just sayin’)

December 19, 2012 at 4:49 pm
(57) noone says:

”Just say’in

December 19, 2012 at 4:51 pm
(58) noon456 says:

rest’o the day

December 19, 2012 at 4:56 pm
(59) peachs and creme says:

she Ratchet

December 19, 2012 at 5:22 pm
(60) David says:

2 irritations:

Mega (as in really large)

They and their as singular

December 19, 2012 at 6:33 pm
(61) genesh says:

Some words and phrases I’ve grown annoyed with in 2012 are “baby bump (already mentioned), double down, f-bomb, bucket list, duh, um, and vajayjay.

December 19, 2012 at 6:39 pm
(62) Craig says:

Issues and moving forward…..Ahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh! all day long at work……..They move forward so much that now
never matters……..Problems what problems we never admit to anything it is an Issue.

Your lack of grammar expert

Craig

December 19, 2012 at 11:27 pm
(63) Dilbert Dweeber says:

1. Awesome
2. Pre-plan (How is that even possible)
3. Going forward
4. Issue (We no longer have problems, only issues)
5. Impact (instead of effect or affect). And do not get me started on negative impact – another impossibility.
6. Hero
7. Meme
8. Myself
9. Community
10. Gifted (instead of gave)

December 20, 2012 at 12:15 am
(64) kellylw says:

There are a few words or phrases that start to get on my nerves. Most have been mentioned, but these are the ones that have not:

“That blows!” (A slang phrase used toward an event or situation demonstrating dislike, disappointment, boredom, disgust, or other negative non-agressive emotion.)

“That blows!” (A phrase used as a vocal showing of empathy and support toward another’s misfortune.)

Pronouncing “ask” as “axe”

Spelling “etc.” as “ect” (the word etcetera…it should be EASY to remember the abbreviation. THE WORD BEGINS WITH ETC.)

“Wassup!” for “What’s up?” (Both should be nixed unless you are signing your bestie’s middle school yearbook…)

“bestie” (best friend)

“Man cave” (Does this imply that men are all unevolved cave men? I would think they would want to change this themselves.)

“Bro code” (I just think this is funny.)

“Swagger” (but I do like “Swagger Wagon” so call me a little bit of a hypocrite on this one. At least the video is cool, and THAT use is NOT OVERUSED!)

“It’s go time!” (OK, did I miss “stop time”?)

“Sweet.” (As a one word reply implying that you like, agree with, endorse something…OR depending on tone of voice…exactly the opposite. Difficult to detect sarcasm with only this one word online.)

“Bros before hoes” (If you hear this on a regular basis, whether you are male or female, you may want to evaluate the company you keep. It’s not just about putting your buddies before your lady, but it is very much about allowing them to disrespect her, even when she’s not around.)

“Grow a pair!” (This is derogatory towards males and is a call to action, daring someone to do something if they had previously backed down from a challenge. This would not be appropriate to say in many settings, such as to an authority figure or at church.)

December 20, 2012 at 12:19 am
(65) kellylw says:

There are a few words or phrases that start to get on my nerves. Most have been mentioned, but these are the ones that have not:

“THIS blows!” (A slang phrase used toward an event or situation demonstrating dislike, disappointment, boredom, disgust, or other negative non-agressive emotion.)

“That blows!” (A phrase used as a vocal showing of empathy and support toward another’s misfortune.)

Pronouncing “ask” as “axe”

Spelling “etc.” as “ect” (the word etcetera…it should be EASY to remember the abbreviation. THE WORD BEGINS WITH ETC.)

“Wassup!” for “What’s up?” (Both should be nixed unless you are signing your bestie’s middle school yearbook…)

“bestie” (best friend)

“Man cave” (Does this imply that men are all unevolved cave men? I would think they would want to change this themselves.)

“Bro code” (I just think this is funny.)

“Swagger” (but I do like “Swagger Wagon” so call me a little bit of a hypocrite on this one. At least the video is cool, and THAT use is NOT OVERUSED!)

“It’s go time!” (OK, did I miss “stop time”?)

“Sweet.” (As a one word reply implying that you like, agree with, endorse something…OR depending on tone of voice…exactly the opposite. Difficult to detect sarcasm with only this one word online.)

“Bros before hoes” (If you hear this on a regular basis, whether you are male or female, you may want to evaluate the company you keep. It’s not just about putting your buddies before your lady, but it is very much about allowing them to disrespect her, even when she’s not around.)

“Grow a pair!” (This is derogatory towards males and is a call to action, daring someone to do something if they had previously backed down from a challenge. This would not be appropriate to say in many settings, such as to an authority figure or at church.)

December 20, 2012 at 1:04 am
(66) kellylw says:

“Ummmmm…”

“IDK, ROFL, LOL, LMFAO, SMFH”

“Like white on rice”

“Stanky” or “stank” (Incorrectly used:
“Wooey, you sho is stanky!”
Correctly used:
“Wow! You had a stinky diaper!”

Incorrectly used:
“You and your stank can get up and outta here.”
Or
“That cat box really do stank.”

Correctly used:
“I think it’s time to go. The sweet elixer of love has become tainted like the stink of a decomposing rose.”

“That is one stinky litter pan!”

The word “stink” can also be used as in raising a commotion.

“The community sure raised a stink when that prisoner was let out early!”

“Ima” (instead of “I’m going to…”)

“ur” (instead of “your”, “you are”, or “you’re”)

Correctly used:
“Your brother seems nice.”
“You are welcome to bring him along.”
“You’re not a big fan of baseball, are you?”

PEOPLE WHO DON’T KNOW WHETHER TO USE “TO” OR “TOO”!

“TO” (USED WHEN GOING SOMEWHERE)
“TOO” (USED WHEN INCLUDING SOMEONE OR SOMETHING; SOMETIMES USED LIKE THE WORD “ALSO”.)

Correctly used:
“I am going to the store.”
“You can come too.”

December 20, 2012 at 1:08 am
(67) liquorstorebear says:

optics (to refer to appearances in the office, rather than technical optics)

drill down

neither here nor there

in any way, shape, or form

whether or not

reach out

talking around (instead of “about”)

orientate

at the end of the day

December 20, 2012 at 1:26 am
(68) kellylw says:

“Ginormous”

“Super-size”

“Mega Super-Size” (Is this REALLY necessary?)

“Mega-hit” (because we apparently are no longer impressed with the chart toppers in the music business. These must be DIFFERENT and much better somehow.)

“Down the crapper/toilet” (describes things you wouldn’t normally be able to fit down a toilet logically, such as someone’s career.)

“A zillionaire” (Don’t aspire to be something that doesn’t exist.)

“A zillion dollars/ zillions of dollars” (This measure is a made up fantasy, but if you ever find it, let us know.)

“Suck it!” (Crude slang term some people say in jest to a buddy, when winning at something, they feel they have some sort of advantage or “upper hand”, but can also mean the opposite, so it can be difficult to decipher over the internet without knowing the context or being able to read body language. Could also be interpreted as sexual harrassment and could be thought of as intimidating if interpreted that way. Generally not a nice thing to say.)

December 20, 2012 at 2:09 am
(69) kellylw says:

Conversate

Fo sho (for sure)

Tru dat! (“That’s true!” Or “I agree.”)

Mayan calendar/ December 21, 2012

End of Days

Zombie Apocalypse

Brain eating zombies

Cannibals

Shootings

Taxes

Partisan/ Non-partisan/ Bi-partisan

POLITICS

SHUT UP!

NO WAY/ WAY!

THAT’S SICK! (Wait…sick is now a GOOD thing?)

CRUNK (Nobody has really been able to explain this other than it is a music style or state of mind. That really didn’t clarify it for me.)

JUNK (male parts, sometimes female parts. It just makes me think yuck…or laugh!)

Blowout SALE! (I hear and see this so much around here that it causes absolutely no sense of urgency or curiosity anymore.)

SUPER SALE! (At this rate, we are getting ripped off at the regular non-sale and days when items are just on “sale”. What’s bigger than THIS?)

ONE OF A KIND FACTORY CLOSEOUT (and yet, here it is again, miracle.)

ONCE IN A LIFETIME (ok how many times have you heard this one and seen it happen more than once? Is there REALLY a once in a lifetime?)

BETTER HURRY-TIME IS RUNNING OUT! (Just annoying sales pressure.)

LIMITED AVAILABILITY (either they’ve sold out already, or their warehouse is stockpiled with what they’re selling and they’re trying to create a demand.)

BATTERIES NOT INCLUDED

MADE IN CHINA (ANOTHER AMERICAN JOB LOST…)

PRESS 1 FOR ENGLISH…. (We ARE in America last I checked…Pess 1 for someone I won’t be able to understand anyway. Great. Another job outsourced to another country.)

(I will be so happy when we get to 2013 unscathed and people stop driving out there like zombies have visited them. Ugh.

I will be glad when we put all the politics and this whole end of the world stuff behind us!)

December 20, 2012 at 2:36 pm
(70) James says:

Therefore, a tummy tuck might be referred to as some sort of necessary abdominal surgery.
In the formation of cellulite Hormones play a dominant role.
There are countless ways to combat natural sagging skin,
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December 21, 2012 at 5:41 am
(71) molly says:

Love to hear that others are offended or irritated by some of the same things I am…but one which was not mentioned was ‘graduated high school’ instead of ‘graduated FROM high school’. Or FROM boot camp. Or FROM university. A lot of the ones on the lists are either downright cultural slang (every subsection of society has its own slang, of course) which have been sucked up by more-or-less mainstream media, or they are advertising jargon which attempts to slap our benumbed brains into a buy-buy-buy frenzy. It’s kind of fun to sit back and watch, though, if you can remain detached from the stupidity.

December 21, 2012 at 6:19 pm
(72) Chois Hobson says:

And, your point being?, let me be clear, if you will, back in the day, at the end of the day.

December 23, 2012 at 8:12 am
(73) Rik Barnes says:

“I know that’s right!’

I get very, very tired of hearing this.

December 23, 2012 at 9:49 am
(74) Rebecca says:

“more importantly” instead of “more important”

“literally” — so misused and overused

“What went through your mind when you heard….” Overused by interviewers.

My nomination for the worst: “The thing is is….” Why would you repeat the verb “is”??

December 28, 2012 at 9:59 am
(75) Patricia Engel says:

He (she) was always there for me. There? Where?

December 29, 2012 at 8:18 pm
(76) Babs says:

I cannot stand, “wheelhouse, narrative, or skill set. TV jopurnalists have very limited vocabularies and imitate one another.

Also, “optics.” This is overused when describing how an action or event “appears” to the public.

January 3, 2013 at 6:12 am
(77) Tim says:

The overuse and misuse of “impact” as well as its bastardized cousins “impacted” (ususally followed by “by”) and “impactful.”

January 3, 2013 at 10:42 am
(78) cathy m says:

Ask, used as a noun, as in “Did you provide the team with a list of asks?” Aaaaaaack!

I also see “provide her the list” and I want to insert a “with”

January 4, 2013 at 11:10 pm
(79) Roger says:

Plan ahead

For all intents and purposes

Long story short

January 6, 2013 at 12:53 am
(80) Fran says:

“change out” when you mean “change” as in “change out the drawer pulls”, or “change out the light bulbs”.

January 18, 2013 at 12:20 pm
(81) Debra says:

Hater
Hating on
LOL
IMHO
Based off of

January 22, 2013 at 8:27 am
(82) David says:

‘opened its doors’ or ‘closed its doors’ as said endlessly on TV news when ‘opened’ or ‘closed’ will do eg. ‘the school closed its doors today’ or ‘shops opened their doors at 9am’ . We know all buildings have doors but we don’t need to keep being reminded of that!

January 23, 2013 at 10:29 pm
(83) Pagluica, Gino says:

“I have an ask.” instead of “I have a question.” Ask is a verb the last time I checked but still people in my company, including myself, continue to use this phrasing. What is wrong with us/me?!

My ask of of everyone is to stop using this word incorrectly.

“No worries”,

Jay (Gino) Pagluica

February 1, 2013 at 4:26 pm
(84) Somewheredownsouth says:

I got to this website motivated by the quest to cast my vote to eliminate the phrase “that being said” from our vocabulary.

February 8, 2013 at 10:30 am
(85) James Cin says:

People are idiots, the plural in the english language is masculine.

“you guys” is correct- whether a mixed group or even all females.

“ladies” is often not accurate

“girls” is patronizing”

February 9, 2013 at 9:38 pm
(86) Ellen says:

I have a co-worker who still says, “Cool beans.” It’s all I can do to keep from laughing out loud.

February 12, 2013 at 2:10 pm
(87) Claudia says:

Since when did everything become SUPER? Super-easy, super-tasty, super-cute….super-annoying to me!

February 13, 2013 at 3:49 pm
(88) Cat says:

- “my bad”
– “it’s all good”
– saying ‘axed’ instead of “he asked for it.”
– ”dome-piece”
– ”grill”
– and ”whatnot”

February 17, 2013 at 11:40 am
(89) Tommie Callahan says:

1. Me, myself, personally when said just before a profiond opion is given.

2. Irregardless (instead of irregard or regardless), as in “irregardless how unqualified you may think I am, I am the man for the job”.

March 15, 2013 at 11:45 am
(90) Richard says:

I’ll be thrilled when this “name-mashing” fad goes down the toilet. “Brangelina” and “Kimye” just to name a couple of them. I’d be insulted to know that my identity was inextricably linked to another’s to the point at which I no longer have a name of my own. Just let this one die, folks.

March 21, 2013 at 2:05 pm
(91) Jim says:

“padded” for walking with bare feet

March 25, 2013 at 11:08 am
(92) Michael Maciel says:

“Gave me a scare”

March 25, 2013 at 11:49 am
(93) Doug says:

This whole list is “like” a great compilation! It’s “like” most people don’t pay attention to “like” what they’re “like” saying. When every other word is “like” the word “Like” it definitely shows that the person speaking is “like” pretty shallow in their thinking. This one “LIKE” drives me up the wall!

March 25, 2013 at 3:41 pm
(94) Patsy says:

“So…yeah.” at the end of a statement. “We all want out to celebrate her birthday… so …yeah”
they come to the end of what they are saying but can’t stop talking …so Yeah!

How many people do you know who have poked their eye out?
I hate when people see someone with a sharp object and say “careful with that you could poke your/someone’s eye out”!

March 25, 2013 at 6:21 pm
(95) Nancy Barrett says:

One of my least favorite is “myself” when it should be either I or me

March 26, 2013 at 9:39 am
(96) Halaluani Lowe says:

This is a great list although many of these have been around for years. I’m glad to see “Fail” and “epic fail” on the list. Here are my nominations for next year:

— Inbox me (for “send me an email”). I can’t bear this.

— Have to agree with Doug on “like” – “So we like went to the club and like had the best time! Damn, it was like, well, like it used to be!”

– “Basically” — the new “like” but is also used occasionally in place of “literally”. Example: Basically, she’s a good person but got into some trouble. It was basically a misdemeanor.”

– For at least 15 years I’ve been hearing and reading about people going to “Prom”. This annoys me. We went to the prom, not to Prom. I have not heard ant differentiation between junior and senior proms when using just “Prom”.

– “fashion-forward”

– “lean in”

March 28, 2013 at 4:45 pm
(97) Kaitlyn Rose says:

Using “which,” which should begin a nonessential clause, to introduce a whole new sentence, as in, “He likes his french fries with lots of ketchup, which I like McDonald’s fries better than Burger King’s.” How did this become so widespread so quickly?

April 9, 2013 at 6:07 pm
(98) Mike says:

“as well”

April 10, 2013 at 3:28 am
(99) Mike says:

How about the misuse of the words “youths” and “teens”, mainly by the ministry of truth (the media), in reference to a certain demographic? It would be funny if it wasn’t so tragic. It’s like living in the old USSR.

May 6, 2013 at 10:53 am
(100) Alex says:

Two current irritating phrases adopted by broadcast news pundits are

1. “I mean,” a surrogate for “Um,” “Uh,” “Duh,” or “Y’know..”
2. “[Someone acting in an official capacity] on the ground…”

While suffering a May 4, 2013, tete-a-tete between Kristen Welker and an MSNBC news announcer, I heard the former ululate “boots on the ground” at least four times within as many sentences concerning an impending decision about U.S. military intervention in Syria.

Two misused words that have (unfortunately) survived the test of time are:

1. “Anticipated,” used to convey “expected” or even “awaited” as in “most-anticipated,” stated breathlessly by major motion picture producers and TV executives to mean “eagerly-awaited” movies and shows.
2. “Anxious,” when used for “eager.”

May 21, 2013 at 12:39 pm
(101) Ed says:

The use of two words are really bothering me currently.
1. “Upcoming” – the use of this word has been bothering me for years. Its use is almost always superfluous as the fact that the subject of the word has not occurred yet is almost always obvious from the sentence structure and/or when the statement is made. E.g. the constant references to the “upcoming 2010 Olympics” made by reporters in 2009.

2. “Humbled” – It is currently popular to use this word when a person is accepting an award or acknowledging a public vote of confidence. Why anyone would feel humbled in such circumstances is beyond me. Being humbled is not a good thing nor does it mean you are humble. If you lose a baseball game 15-0 or go from 156 seats to 2 seats in a parliamentary election (Canadian election in 1993), you have been humbled.

May 28, 2013 at 11:55 pm
(102) Art says:

I hate the road sign “Reduced speed ahead.” Does it mean “Reduced speed limit” ahead? Why not use the imperative “Reduce speed ahead?” That gets the message across far more clearly.

June 14, 2013 at 8:39 am
(103) njersey says:

24/7 is a legal term that we use in leases to define access rights.

June 24, 2013 at 12:38 pm
(104) Jenny says:

Love this list!
I’d add:

Enjoy!

June 24, 2013 at 3:43 pm
(105) Alex Morris says:

“Notorious”, which means criminally famous in lieu of “famous” when describing one who is well known and has no criminal past or reputation.

“Legend” and “legendary” when describing actual people who are celebrities or famous.

July 13, 2013 at 12:36 am
(106) Lance says:

I don’t like when reporters write the expression “the gun went off”, as in “two children were playing with the gun when it went off”. As if the gun were going to “go off” all by itself at some preset time, but they had the misfortune to be playing with it at the wrong time. If only they had been playing with it at the right time, nobody would have been hurt.

Handguns and rifles (the preferred terms, instead of “guns”) don’t just “go off”. If they could, then you could just load it, set it on a table, and at some point it would just fire. Who knows what condition the universe would need be in to make it fire though. Firearms don’t just “go off” all by themselves. That would be a product liability that any lawyer would jump at.

I believe that most reporters know the truth, they are just either consciously or subconsciously trying to lessen the blow for any friends or family who might read the article.

The proper way to write it is “Two teenagers were playing with the handgun when it was fired.” This puts the responsibility where it belongs, not on the handgun itself, but on the person who was playing with it. Another way would be to write “Two teenagers were playing with a handgun when [insert name] squeezed the trigger while aiming it at [insert other name].” This would be much more intellectually honest.

Peace Out (another one I loathe).

July 22, 2013 at 3:39 pm
(107) Angelica says:

Oldsteimers instead of Alzheimer’s, uggh
And oldtimer instead of old/elderly person.
I hear those words a lot!

July 24, 2013 at 4:25 pm
(108) Penny says:

uptick, to describe anything that increases, not just the stock market.

August 8, 2013 at 9:39 am
(109) J.A. says:

“I for one”

August 15, 2013 at 2:05 am
(110) CL says:

Narrative-the most over used word to date. Everything is a “narrative”

Case in point, watching CNN! The news anchor and person being interviewed each said “narrative” four times each in a 90 second interview.
“Really” as a statement, or question, or as an expression of frustration.

August 20, 2013 at 8:01 pm
(111) jhona huntington says:

THE number one offensive incorrect use of a word or term is people using the word “drug” to describe being moved! I’ve heard this sentence countless times, ” the man drugged me from the car”. (you mean he doped you up and then dragged you from the car?) Thanks, had to get that off my chest!

August 27, 2013 at 8:57 pm
(112) B. Olufe says:

So many people substituting “per” for “pre” as in perdict for predict and persent for present (accent on the second syllable).

September 4, 2013 at 10:29 am
(113) alton campbell says:

“BOOTS ON THE GROUND” dehumanizes our soldiers. Why not say “soldiers on the ground”? It’s easier for a president to put “boots on the ground” than for him to put our soldiers, or our sons and daughters, into a war. It’s time for it to stop. Respect our soldiers for who they are and THEY ARE NOT BOOTS. It’s time for this euphemism to stop.

September 6, 2013 at 4:37 pm
(114) mllp says:

‘years of age’ and ‘years young’
Ugh.

September 23, 2013 at 3:09 pm
(115) BAAS says:

I hate hearing people say “I, myself” as if clarifying who “I” is!
And I agree with the whole “pop” thing–I wonder if it was some interior designer who started it.

October 2, 2013 at 7:54 pm
(116) Laura says:

Political commentators using the word “look” before every other comment. Count how many times they use it in one segment.

Tv reporters starting a diatribe with the word “so”

October 4, 2013 at 10:08 am
(117) Susie says:

“physicality” (hearing that word is like fingers on a chalkboard to me)

“no problem” (just say, you’re welcome)

“guys” (a table of women should not be referred to as “guys”)

“awesome”

“it is what it is”

“circle back around”

“between you and I” (between anything and I)

“athleticism” (overused by sportscasters)

“vacay” or “stacation” (for vacation)

“at this point in time”

“at the end of the day”

“back in the day” (which day?)

misuse of “me” and “I”

misuse of “lay” and “lie”

misuse of “your” and “you’re”

“price point”

“throw someone under the bus”

“shoot me an email”

“reach out to her” (just call her)

“‘n stuff” or “stuff like that”

“irregardless”

“no worries”

“my bad”

“hello?” (to show annoyance)

And how can I forget the overuse of the word “like”….”I’m like……and she’s like, wow…..and I’m like, hello?”

November 3, 2013 at 1:02 am
(118) William Monk says:

Up or Down vote!
I hate it!
Those who created this as a way NOT to be responsible and separate themselves from anything to do with compromise or fair debate!
Limiting responsibility for voting for or against anything as they can muddy the waters and get away with doing nothing!

November 5, 2013 at 11:07 pm
(119) Stan Higgins says:

What happened to “pled”. As in “he pled guilty to the crime”. Now everyone in the media is saying “pleaded”, “he pleaded guilty to the crime”. What! Does that mean now that “I feaded my dog this morning” or “I readed your email” What changed? Maybe the media keeps changing our grammar just to show us they can do it.

December 9, 2013 at 7:17 pm
(120) Matt says:

EXTRA WORD… to make something sound more important…
1. Form Factor… “The part has a square form.”… not a square form factor.
2. Skill Set… “He has good manual skills.”… not “He has a good manual skill set. (2 extra words)
3. Price Point… It’s a price
4. Debt service… It’s a debt

Words that imply that the author is correct…
1. Starting a sentence with the word “Listen…”
2. Starting a sentence with the word “Look…”

Annoying phrases…
1. “Game changer” (almost never used in relation to a game)
2. The product is “resonating” with customers (the product may be liked by customers, but rarely do products resonate, that is, vibrate at a frequency that is induced by another object vibrating at some frequency)
3. “Now we are going to ‘build’ the sandwich.”
4. “Now we are going to ‘plate’ the eggplant.” (‘plate’ is not a verb)
5. “Boots on the ground” (referring to a young person serving this country by risking their life, as a “boot” is an insult and a reflection of how little our leaders and the media care about young soldiers, not even considering them as people). In addition, they should atleast consider each soldier as 2 boots on the ground, so the recorded death toll should be doubled

December 9, 2013 at 7:19 pm
(121) Matt Willenkin says:

Height pronounced as HEIGTH

December 16, 2013 at 6:29 pm
(122) Bonnie says:

I just read one in an e-mail that makes me want to slap the sender: using the word “gifted” instead of given or gave.

December 18, 2013 at 5:18 pm
(123) Larry Brandenburg says:

This is a pronunciation problem but I’m sick of hearing it: “Din’nt.”

Said mostly by kids.

AND

The phrase that scars you as a bimbo for life :

“I KNOW, RIGHT?”

January 28, 2014 at 2:49 pm
(124) betterncoffee says:

“iconic”
“literally”

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